Real World Globes in the classroom

Dry Erase Globes & kits available now!


  • Pangaea Globes from the Mississippian through the Cretaceous
  • Geological & Topographical Globes of the World
  • Mars, Jupiter, Venus, Galilean Moons
  • 3D Maps and Geological Maps
  • Seafloor Magnetic Anomaly -- and many more!
  • NEW Available Summer 2020 -- Geologic Globe of the Moon
  • 30" Globes and 18" Globes


    Seafloor Magnetic Anomaly 30" Globe
    for Penn State University
    with Joe Roubal

    THEMIS Globe


    Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS)
    on board the Mars Odyssey spacecraft
    displayed at Arizona State University
    (available 18")

    Geologic Globe of Earth's Moon


    Dry erase globe of the new Unified Geologic Map of the Moon
    with shaded topography from the Lunar Orbiter Laser Altimeter (LOLA).
    This geologic globe is a synthesis of six Apollo-era regional geologic maps,
    updated based on data from recent satellite missions.
    It will serve as a reference for lunar science
    and future human missions to the Moon.
    Credit: NASA/GSFC/USGS
    (available 18")

    Dry Erase Globes for Lab Exercises


    Robert Ripley With His Globe!

    Structural Geology

    Real World Globes can be used to study of the three-dimensional distribution of rock units with respect to their deformational histories.

    Lessons & Activities

    Curriculum based assignments, and answer keys specifically for Real World Globes, and Maps.

    Real World Globes for the classroom!

    See our globes

    Visit our shop

    Real World Globes available for lessons and activities.

    Pangaea

    Pangaea

    The scientific task is to explain with a strong visual impact the relationships between the ancient supercontinent called Pangaea.

    Structural Geology

    Structural Geology

    The scientific task is to explain with a strong visual impact the relationships between the ancient supercontinent called Pangaea.

    THEMIS Mars

    THEMIS Mars

    The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) is an instrument on board the Mars Odyssey spacecraft, launched from Kennedy Space Center in 2001, traveling around Mars in a 2-hour orbit.